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5 things you should never say during an interview

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Lizzie Tasker Job Search, Interviews, Career Advice...

We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again; interview preparation is essential! Often, we focus on all of the things you should be saying during the interview. In this week’s blog, we’re going to look at some of the things which you should *never* say during an interview.  Had an interview nightmare? Let us know in the comments below!

We get it. Interviews are scary and even the coolest of cucumbers can be subject to a few nerves on the big day. One of the ways nerves can come across is by talking quickly, or perhaps by speaking too much. We’ve all had that feeling when perhaps something hasn’t quite come out as you intended it to! Whereas it’s been said that people who come across well at interview are able to provide quality, meaningful answers in a succinct and considered way.

So as part of your preparation for your next interview, in addition to thinking about the things you do want to get across, take a few minutes to make a note of the following topics or phrases to avoid!

In our opinion, these are the biggest turn-offs for interviewers, and in some cases, could mean the difference between getting the job and not. So, take a deep breath, and read on:

1. My last job/employer/boss was rubbish

A potential employer does not want to hear negativity towards your previous role. After all, they’ll be wondering if you’ll be saying these things about them next time around and in the worst cases, they could deem you as being emotionally immature.

An interview situation is never the right time to bad mouth or complain (even if it’s true!); some things are better left unsaid. Focus on why it’s right for you to seek a new opportunity.

2. What's this job again? What does this company do?

You might have applied for several roles and it is easy to lose track. However, do not walk into any interview without being clear on what the role is. Find the original advert, and/or ask if the company have a job description available.

It’s also essential to have researched the company so you’re prepared for any questions, or even better, you’re able to drop in some of your knowledge while answering the interviewer’s questions.

3. How much holiday do I get?

It’s definitely something you’d want to know before accepting a job offer, but an interview is not usually the right time to raise questions over holidays or other benefits.  Tread carefully, you don’t want to appear like you’re just there for the pay packet and can’t wait to be jetting off at the earliest opportunity.

4. I'm not sure what I want to do / I want to be CEO in 5 years

If you’re asked any questions about your long-term plans, the interviewer is going to be looking for someone who sees themselves staying with the company, but also for someone who is realistic about their career aspirations. By sounding unsure, the interviewer might suspect that you’re not going to be committed to the role. By sounding over ambitious, your confidence could be misconceived as arrogance.

5. A lie! 

Last but definitely not least, never ever lie to your interviewer! Honesty is always the best policy. If you know there’s something in your background that you are concerned about (perhaps your school grades or a reason for leaving a job), consider beforehand how you can best overcome this at interview and try to frame in a positive light, for example, by saying what you have learnt from a situation.